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Tomon
T-YO; Tensai no Tensei:: God of Truth, Faith and Righteousness
T-YO; Tensai no Tensei:: God of Truth, Faith and Righteousness
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PostSubject: Quicpic   Sat Mar 11, 2017 4:08 pm

EX.

Hey everyone,

It's Ty here, A.K.A. ME, T-YO, coming to give you the 411 on some interesting psychological facts, opinions and issues.

It is important to take very good care of your mental health by reducing great deals of stress, especially in those who thing hard, critically and analytically. Those who think more critically or more intricately often get stressed more easily because they are using more of their mind than those who do not, which makes them more susceptible to rage, sickness and general mental, emotional and physical detriment.

Psychological effects can ensure or destroy mentality and other spiritual or physical attributes of the individual. Reflection helps with mental managing as does meditation. When the mind is overworked, the body is tired and the spirit is weak, which leads to breakdowns, overreacting, underreacting or general loss of control.

Those who hear this message, be aware of who you put mental stress on and how much stress they put on themselves mentally. Those who think more powerfully often also stress themselves out more than those who think very little or simply, and therefore the same applications to them as with one who does or thinks less is abusive to the thinker because of the additional stress that is necessary for someone unlike them, but harmful and wasteful to someone like them. It's important to know this, be you an employer, a teacher, a friend, a family member or a significant other in order to help better understand others and sometimes yourself.

That's all for right now. It's me, T-YO, signing off now and leaving you with something to think about;

Question: What is the best way to relieve mental stress for you? Is that a temporary relief or a long-term relief?

Think about this and tune into UBM; Our Media, Our Message, Our Move.
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Tomon
T-YO; Tensai no Tensei:: God of Truth, Faith and Righteousness
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PostSubject: Re: Quicpic   Sat Apr 08, 2017 10:50 am

Topic; Business

Title; Will Automatons Take Over Jobs?

Reference: http://ideas.ted.com/will-automation-take-away-all-our-jobs/

In the 45 years since the introduction of the automated teller machine, those vending machines that dispense cash, the number of human bank tellers employed in the United States has roughly doubled, from about a quarter of a million in 1970 to a half a million today, with 100,000 added since the year 2000.

Many of the great inventions of the last 200 years were designed to replace human labor.

Tractors were developed to substitute mechanical power for human physical toil. Assembly lines were engineered to replace inconsistent human handiwork with machine perfection. Computers were programmed to swap out error-prone, inconsistent human calculation with digital perfection.

The fraction of US adults employed in the labor market is higher now in 2016 than it was in 1890, and it’s risen in just about every decade in the intervening 125 years. This poses a paradox. Our machines increasingly do our work for us.

Automating a subset of a position’s tasks doesn’t make the other ones unnecessary — in fact, it makes them more important.

Banks quickly discovered ATMs also made it cheaper to open new branches, so the number of bank branches increased by about 40 percent in the same time period. The net result was more branches and more tellers. As their routine, cash-handling tasks receded, they became less like checkout clerks and more like salespeople, forging relationships with customers, solving problems and introducing them to new products like credit cards, loans and investments. They were doing a more cognitively demanding job.

In general, automating some subset of a position’s tasks doesn’t make the other ones unnecessary — in fact, it makes them more important and increases their economic value.

As our tools improve, technology magnifies our leverage and increases the importance of our expertise, judgment and creativity.

Material abundance has never eliminated perceived scarcity.

Once we create a technology that makes us sufficiently productive at something, we’ve basically worked our way out of a job.

Many of the industries in which we now work — health and medicine, finance and insurance, electronics and computing — were tiny or barely existent a century ago. Many of the products that we purchase, like air conditioners, sport utility vehicles, computers and mobile devices, were unattainably expensive, or just hadn’t been invented back then. As automation frees our time and increases the scope of what is possible, we invent new products, new ideas and new services that command our attention, occupy our time and spur consumption.
Material abundance has never eliminated perceived scarcity, or, in the words of economist Thorstein Veblen, invention is the mother of necessity.

Automation creates wealth by allowing us to do more work in less time, but there is no economic law which mandates we will use our wealth well, and this is something worth worrying about.

We’ve faced equally momentous economic transformations in the past, and we’ve come through them successfully.

The challenge today is not that we’re running out of work — the US has added 14 million jobs since the 2008 recession — but that many of those jobs are not good jobs.

What’s more, many citizens cannot qualify for the good jobs that are being created.

High-education, high-wage jobs, like doctors and nurses, programmers and engineers, and marketing and sales managers. Employment and employment growth are robust in those professions. Similarly, growth is robust in many low-skill, low-education jobs, like food service, cleaning, security and home-health work. At the same time, employment is shrinking in many middle-education, middle-wage, middle-class jobs, like blue-collar production and operative positions and white-collar clerical and sales positions.

The reasons behind the contracting middle are not mysterious — many middle-skill jobs use well-understood rules and procedures that increasingly can be codified in software and executed by computers. The challenge this phenomenon creates is that it knocks out rungs in the economic ladder, shrinks the size of the middle class, and threatens to make us a more stratified society, divided between highly paid, highly educated professionals doing interesting work and low-wage employees whose primary responsibility is to see to the comfort and health of the affluent.

What this highlights is the primacy of our institutions, most especially our schools, in allowing us to reap the harvest of our technological prosperity. On many occasions in the last two centuries, scholars and activists have raised the alarm that we were running out of work and making ourselves obsolete.
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